Nintendo Virtual Boy Console Box

39.00£

Faithful reproduction of the Nintendo Virtual Boy Console Box without inner cartons, made of sturdy 1.4 mm thick double-wave cardboard. This box is shipped disassembled. Easy assembly: cut, fold, and paste. VAT included.

Delivery before day 28/05/2024
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Description

Faithful reproduction of the Nintendo Virtual Boy Console Box without inner cartons, made of sturdy 1.4 mm thick double wave cardboard. This box is shipped disassembled. Easy assembly: cut, fold and paste. VAT included.

This box is shipped disassembled to facilitate shipping and protect it from possible damage.

Nintendo Virtual Boy console packaging perfect for your console.

The assembly is simple and can be done by anyone:

- Cut the outline of the template

- Fold through the right areas

- Paste in the area indicated in the template.

When you finish you will get a box identical to the original but more resistant.

Nintendo Virtual Boy console box

Packaging of the Nintendo Virtual Boy console to store your retro console as if you had just bought it.

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Paperboard used cardboard type

The box is made of sturdy 1.4 mm cardboard with 1 wave cardboard core, like the original. Its surface allows high resolution printing and great definition in its colors.

console box

IMPORTANT:

If you reside in France you must make your purchase at retroboxes.fr

If you reside in Germany you must make your purchase at retroboxes.de

If you reside in Spain or other countries you must make your purchase at retroboxes.es

Since from this store we only deliver to the United Kingdom, USA, Canadá or Ireland.

Do you remember?
The Virtual Boy ((バ ー チ ャ ル ボ ー イ in Japan) is a 32-bit desktop-portable machine developed and released by Nintendo. It was released on July 21, 1995 in Japan and on August 14 of the same year in North America at a price of around US $ 180. He suffered huge price drops during the six months of his life.

The system does not have a full 384 x 224 matrix of LEDs as a display. It uses a pair of 1 x 224 linear arrays and quickly scans the array across the eye’s field of view using curved mirrors. A full-size screen, although mechanically simpler, would have increased the physical size and unit cost of the Virtual Boy to the point where the system became expensive.
The Virtual Boy, which uses an oscillating mirror to transform a 1-D dotted line into a 2-D dotted field, requires high-performance LEDs to function properly.

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